More signal, less noise—we distill the day’s critical cyber security news into a concise daily briefing.

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Title Date published
Daily: DDoS concerns mount—not just Mirai botnets, but LDAP exploitation. Ukrainian hacktivists release emails they say belong to one of Putin's closest advisors. (Moscow says they're fake. Moscow's on its own.) 2016-10-27
Daily: Youth and cyber make a bad-news-good-news story (it's complicated). Mirai DDoS may be the work of skids. ISIS adjusts its messaging. 2016-10-26
Daily: The Mirai botnet DDoS attack, its consequences and attribution, with commentary from various observers. 2016-10-25
Daily: Recovering from Friday's IoT-botnet driven Internet outages. Industry notes and news of cyber conflict in East Asia and the Middle East. And US-Russian tension in cyberspace remains high. 2016-10-24
Daily & Week in Review: Bear again, and WikiLeaks (also again). Chinese hackers return, now after infrastructure companies. Debit card hacking epidemic in India. 2016-10-21
Daily: CyberMaryland updates. Great power cyber conflict (and organized cyber crime on the side). Vote hacking, agents of influence, and information operations. IoT botnets continue to romp. 2016-10-20
Daily: Blockchains at a brewery. Ecuador says it cut Assange's Internet connection. US retaliation against Russian cyber ops may aim at embarrassment. Ransomware in London's City. 2016-10-19
Daily: Assange still has asylum, but not so much connectivity. RT's banking woes. US-Russian cyber relations continue to worsen. General (ret.) Cartwright pleads guilty to lying about Stuxnet leaks. Email server controversy gutters on. 2016-10-18
Daily: Pakistan phishes Indian Army. US election hacks continue as the US investigates and mulls its response. New ransomware strains. More IoT botnet infestations. ISIS struggles to explain loss of Dabiq. 2016-10-17
Daily & Week in Review: Political hacks: email, Twitter, and iCloud. Calls mount for tough US response to Russian cyber operations. Two Android vulnerabilities and one threat revealed. Verizon calls Yahoo! breach "material." 2016-10-14
Daily: Patriotic hacktivism in South Asia? US, Russia cyber stare-down continues. IoT devices exploited as proxies. Cyber sector sees market volatility. Cartels launder money through games. 2016-10-13
Daily: Australia confirms foreign intelligence service hacked Bureau of Meteorology. TV5Monde and its false-flag hack. Trojan hitting SWIFT. Patch Tuesday notes. US-Russian cyber showdown. 2016-10-12
Daily: US attributes DNC hacking to Russian government, promises to protect itself. Russia dismisses attribution as "rubbish." WikiLeaks posts Clinton campaign emails. 2016-10-11
Daily & Week in Review: Skepticism concerning Guccifer 2.0's claimed hack of the Clinton Foundation. NSA contractor arrest. Mirai botnet exploits. Security fatigue. 2016-10-07
Daily: NSA contract worker arrested with classified material. TalkTalk gets a record data breach fine. Yahoo! surveillance story's still murky. Thoughts from AUSA on cyber innovation and information warfare. 2016-10-06
Daily: Guccifer 2.0 claims (to general skepticism) a Clinton Foundation hack. Information operations versus voting. Yahoo! and surveillance of customers. Insulin pump vulnerability reported. 2016-10-05
Daily: AUSA update. Mirai botnet shows risks of default IoT passwords. US-Russian tensions rise over imposition of costs. 2016-10-04
Daily: Hackers said to "probe" US voting systems. IoT botnet source code released. "DressCode" malware afflicts Android devices. Industry notes. SEC urged to make an example of Yahoo! 2016-10-03
Daily & Week in Review: Election hacking, journalist hacking, and the rise of TbpS DDoS. More reflections on the Yahoo! breach. Ransomware and other forms of extortion. 2016-09-30
Daily: Yahoo! hackers seem to have been crooks (who sold to other crooks, and to government(s)). Toxic data and credential problems. Election hacking. 2016-09-29
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